This page contains articles I’ve written about architectural photography and atmospheres published in peer-reviewed journals that will be updated periodically

Njar


Vol. 26, No. 1 (2014)
Go to article Get PDF

Nine facts about conventions in architectual photography.

This study is one of the first to use content analysis of images as a means of interpreting architectural discourse. Nine facts were extracted from a detailed analysis of images that appeared in 3493 pages of the Finnish Architectural Review (ARK) between 1912 and 2012. Close attention was paid to the types of images used repeatedly in order to focus on key editorial and photographic decisions. Editorial decisions consisted of type, size, chromatic scale and number of images. Photographic decisions consisted of human presence, weather, depth-of-field and camera orientation for interior and exterior photographs. Data, which quantifies the frequency of each type of image, indicates that there is a strong reliance on visual conventions in ARK. When considering the limited range of images used in the publication, it becomes clear there is little correlation between the complexity of architectural language and environments and the simplicity of its depiction. That discrepancy suggests there is a need for research and development in the field of architectural photography in order to better inform readers about the diversity of architectural practices. This argument will be unfolded in this paper and supported both by data and practitioner insights.

Keywords:
architectural photography, content analysis, editorial practices, conventions, finnish architectural review

Jar


Journal for Artistic Research, 3 (2013)
Go to article Get PDF

A Hinge:
Field-testing the Relationship Between Photography and Architecture.

This article seeks to share the methods and preliminary results of an artistic research project in the field of architectural photography. A central concern is the representation of atmosphere in place of the standard depiction of objects. Important also is an attempt at co-design through an interview process with architects based on the notion of the dialectic. This aspect of the study is important not only for this experiment itself but is also crucial for analyzing the scalability of practices pursued in this investigation. Findings include excerpts from interviews and examples of photographs. More than just a project about photographic practices, however, this study is part of a larger investigation into the relationship that has developed between photography and architecture, focussing especially on Finland and Denmark, and the institutional practices of architects, publishers and photographers working in collaboration.

Keywords:
atmosphere, architecture, architectural photography, artistic research

Peer review


This article is currently in peer review
Get PDF

Practice Based Education - by Bridge or Tunnel?

The emergent status of practice-based research within the arts is surprising, given the long tradition of research and reflective practice as the working methodology of artists. Stranger still is the scepticism towards its application in arts education. This paper will address those problems via the impasse indicated by current literature on the topic of entrepreneurial learning. As one way out of that dead-end, a case study is presented which applies the practice-based learning of a doctoral thesis to the learning environment of an interdisciplinary course in architectural photography.

Keywords:
Practice-Based Research, Entrepreneurial Education, Art Education, Photography Studies, Architecture Studies, Bridge.

Peer review


This article is currently in peer review
Get PDF

Safety in numbers: The atmospheric grid

Architectural photography is crucial both for the historical understanding of architecture and its promotion in a competitive global market. The role of a select group of photographers is integral to the success of each. However, little has been done to scrutinise elements common to their practice and question their possible origins and common characteristics such as the categories of atmospheric effects. In order to do so, this paper presents a taxonomy of architectural photography as a means of analysing architectural discourse and reconceptualise architectural photography through the frame of atmospheres. I will present analyses both of my own work as an architectural photographer and of images appearing in a respected global publication made by other photographers. This method of enquiry and means of classifying visualisation is offered as a practical tool for photographers, architects and educators as well as a critical tool for discourse analysis.

Keywords:
Grids, Architecture, Photography, Discourse